WHERE TO START 

People often don’t know where to start to get the mental health services they need. We want you to feel confident that there is help available.
 

We always recommend starting with your GP and having a chat with them about what is going on for you. Your local GP or other health professionals can help connect you with the right mental health service.

HOW A GP CAN HELP

 

Even if you are not sure your are experiencing a mental health problem, a good place to start is with your GP.

When you see your doctor, they will assess what help you need. This could include:
• making a mental health assessment
• creating a mental health treatment plan (MHTP)
• referring you to a psychiatrist or other mental health professional
• giving you a prescription for medicines to treat depression or anxiety.

 

Be sure to book a longer consultation when you make the appointment.

HOW TO GET A MENTAL HEALTH treatment PLAN (mhtp)

  • A MHTP is a plan your doctor writes with you about treating a mental health condition.  

  • Your mental health treatment plan will have goals agreed by you and your doctor.

  • It will also have treatment options and support services available. 

  • It also helps you to access eligible, private allied health professionals like psychologists, social workers or occupational therapists who can help you to get better and live well.

  • Medicare can offer a rebate for up to 10 counselling sessions per year with an eligible Psychologist , Occupational Therapist or Social Worker.

 

Find out more on the headspace website

 

 

When do I need support

Every year 1 in 5 Australians will experience a mental health condition which affects how they feel, think, behave and relate to others.

It’s common to feel unsure and to wonder whether you should try to handle things on your own.

 

Mental illness is a general term that refers to a group of illnesses, much the same way that heart disease refers to a wide range of illnesses and disorders that affect the heart. These conditions cover a wide spectrum from a severe and complex mental illness that significantly impacts the person to a mental health condition which may be temporary as a reaction to the stress in people’s life.

 

This can develop into more severe mental health condition so it’s important to seek help. Referrals are prioritised according to risk and need rather than diagnosis. Urgent care is given to people in crisis and who are at risk and they may be co-managed with other services.

It is always ok to ask for help – even if you’re not sure you are experiencing a specific mental health problem.

 

You might want to seek help if you’re:

  • worrying more than usual

  • finding it hard to enjoy your life

  • having thoughts and feelings that are difficult to cope with, which have an impact on your day-to-day life

  • Having thoughts of ending your life

  • interested to find more support or treatment.

  • Worried about someone that you live with or care for

BROWSE OUR RESOURCES

It's common to feel unsure and to wonder whether you should try to handle things on your own.
It is always ok to ask for help – even if you're not sure you are experiencing a specific mental health problem.

 

© 2020 Deniliquin Mental Health Awareness Group

If you or someone you know has concerns about their mental health, please see the GP or navigate these pages for help. 

If you or someone you know is feeling mentally distressed or suicidal please call Accessline 1800 800 944 or present to the nearest ED department and they will help you access Mental Health Emergency Services.  

If a life is in danger, please CALL 000 straight away.